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Random Stuff about Random Things...Totally Random.
cynicalmoderate:

“Watchers in the Night” by Thomas Blackspear

“The angel of the Lord shall encamp round about them that fear him: and shall deliver them.”

(Book of Pslams 33:8, Douay-Rheims)
When I was little I saw this picture in a store and it quickly became one of my favorites. I only saw it only for a brief second in the store, but the image remained with me and when I would get scared at night I would recall it, and the idea there was an angel guarding me while I slept helped me feel safe. One day I hope to own a print of this.

cynicalmoderate:

Watchers in the Night” by Thomas Blackspear

“The angel of the Lord shall encamp round about them that fear him: and shall deliver them.”

(Book of Pslams 33:8, Douay-Rheims)

When I was little I saw this picture in a store and it quickly became one of my favorites. I only saw it only for a brief second in the store, but the image remained with me and when I would get scared at night I would recall it, and the idea there was an angel guarding me while I slept helped me feel safe. One day I hope to own a print of this.

(Source: cagedsanity)

(Source: twoandahalfcube)

the-garden-of-delights:




“A beauty with doves” by Charles Joshua Chaplin (1825-1891).

the-garden-of-delights:

“A beauty with doves” by Charles Joshua Chaplin (1825-1891).

fleursetcouronnes:

Gustav Klimt, Death and Life

fleursetcouronnes:

Gustav Klimt, Death and Life

izmia:

Creative World water day Advertisement: Think about what you could save when you save water - Yaratıcı Dünya Su Günü Reklamı: Su tasarrufu yaptığınız da, ne kurtarabiliceğinizi düşünün.

  • Artist: Luis Enríquez Bacalov
  • Track: Django Theme (instrumental)
  • Album: Django: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

oldhollywood:

Luis Enríquez BacalovDjango Theme (instrumental) (Django: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

earthasaurous:

Strawberry Peanut Butter Milkshake
2 glasses 

1 banana
1 cup oat milk (or milk of your choice) 
4 tbsp peanut butter
10 fresh strawberries, cut in quarters
1/2 lime, juice 
Pulse oat milk, peanut butter, banana and 2 ice cubes in a blender. Divide the strawberries in 2 large glasses and muddle them together with fresh lime juice! Pour the peanut butter milkshake on top of the strawberry mash and serve immediately.

(via veganfeast)

Now this looks cosy.  I could sit there and do my knitting.

Now this looks cosy.  I could sit there and do my knitting.

(Source: , via thelittlecorner)

Come on baby light my fire!

Come on baby light my fire!

(Source: browndresswithwhitedots, via promenonsnous)

prostheticknowledge:

Intricate Japanese Movable Type Sets 

Dark Roasted Blend provides some history and great photos on the subject of early Japanese (and Asia) printing:

Craft letterpress companies are experiencing a revival in recent times, and nowhere it is more evident than in Japan. Most of you will be familiar with the ancient Chinese and Japanese art of woodblock printing, but masterpieces created with wood and metal movable type are somewhat lesser known, although they show craftsmanship and attention to detail similar to fine woodblock prints. 

The first movable type and printing presses were invented in Asia, not Europe.

…but their development stalled because of the extreme complexity and sheer number of Chinese and Korean characters (the same problem that the Asian cultures faced with the transition to typewriters and the internet). We can thank the simplicity of Western alphabets for the rapid development and adoption of the printed word in Europe, which quickly lead to the Renaissance and further advances in culture and education.

It is a widespread misconception that Johannes Gutenberg created the first movable type system and the printing press, around 1450 A.D. It’s true, Gutenberg was the first to make his movable type from a certain alloy of lead, tin, and antimony (which was more efficient than iron, used in Asia) - but movable type itself was originally invented in China around 1040 A.D. by Bi Seng (during the Song Dynasty). The new system was badly needed to replace the labor-intensive woodblock printing technique, where a single wooden block was carved to represent a single page.

More interesting information and great photos on the subject can be found at Dark Roasted Blend here

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

SOLAR SHINGLES
Dow Powerhouse solar shingles blend in with your traditional shingles and apparently do not require any special tools for installation.

SOLAR SHINGLES

Dow Powerhouse solar shingles blend in with your traditional shingles and apparently do not require any special tools for installation.

Urban Cityscapes Spray Painted on Cardboard Panels by EVOL

German street artist EVOL (previously) is currently showing a number of new pieces at Jonathan LeVine gallery. The new works feature urban facades spray painted with the use of stencils on flat sheets of cardboard. Much like his outdoor graffiti, these stencils display an uncanny attention to detail, depicting light and shadow that transforms mundane surfaces of consumer packaging into fascinating, seemingly multi-dimensional pieces of art. The show runs through May 5th. (via juxtapoz)

Hazelnut and strawberry celebration cakeThink of this cake as a gussied-up version of a Victoria sponge. The flavours are the same, as we’ve got the well-worn charm of strawberry jam, lemon and (butter)cream. Folding beaten egg whites into the batter, as done with chiffon cakes, results in an airy, delicate crumb. I’ve gone and mussed up that delicacy a little with ground hazelnuts, but I think the modest sacrifice in height is worth it — the cake has fluff but also has enough structure to stand up to the rich weight of the preserves, and it’s still plenty tall. I also happen to think that the teensy flecks of gold and brown look pretty, so there’s that, too.
The layers are adaptated from the Fluffy Yellow Layer Cake in The Cook’s Illustrated Cookbook (America’s Test Kitchen, 2011). The cake uses 6 yolks and 3 egg whites, so be sure to keep those extra 3 whites aside if making the Swiss Meringue Buttercream. 
For the cake Softened butter and cake flour for pans 2 ounces hazelnuts, skin on, roasted and cooled 2 cups cake flour, sifted 1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon kosher salt1 3/4 cup (12 1/4 ounces) granulated sugar, divided10 tablespoons (5 ounces, 1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly 1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature3 tablespoons neutral oil 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 6 egg yolks, at room temperature 3 egg whites, at room temperature 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
To assemble1/2-3/4 cup strawberry preserves1/4-1/2 teaspoon lemon finely-grated lemon zest, or to taste1/2 recipe Swiss Buttercream, with 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt added at the start (and without coconut)
Preheat an oven to 350°F (175°C). Grease three 8x2-inch pans with softened butter. Line the bases with parchment paper, grease the parchment, then dust bottoms and sides with flour, tapping out excess. Set aside.
In a food processor fitted with the metal blade, grind the hazelnuts into a fine meal. Stop the machine, scrape down the sides and pulse again one or two times. You should have about 1/2 cup hazelnut meal.
In a large bowl, whisk together the ground hazelnuts, cake flour, baking powder, baking soda, kosher salt and 1 1/2 cups of granulated sugar. In another bowl, or a jug with a pouring spout, whisk together the melted butter, buttermilk, neutral oil, vanilla extract and egg yolks. Set aside. 
In the bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites at medium speed until foamy. Sprinkle in the cream of tartar. Increase the mixer speed to medium-high, and with the machine running, pour in the remaining 1/4 cup granulated sugar in a steady stream. Continue to beat until the egg whites are glossy and stiff peaks form, about 2 to 3 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, scrape the egg whites into a bowl and set aside.
Add flour mixture to the now-empty mixer bowl. With the machine running on low speed, slowly pour in the buttermilk mixture, stirring until just incorporated, around 20 seconds. Stop the machine, scrape down the sides of the bowl and whisk again until there’s no visible flour, around 15 seconds more (note: due to the hazelnuts, this batter will not be completely smooth).
With a rubber spatula, stir 1/3 of the beaten egg whites into the batter to lighten. Add 1/2 of the remaining whites and fold gently until almost combined, a few white streaks can remain. Add the last of the whites and continue to fold until no streaks remain. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared cake pans. Tap the pans gently on the counter a few times to release any large air bubbles. 
Bake layers in a preheated oven until the cake begins to pull away from the edge of the pan and a cake tester (toothpick) inserted in the centre comes out clean, around 20 minutes. Cool cakes in pans on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Loosen the edge of the cakes with an offset spatula or butter knife, then invert onto a wire rack lined with clean parchment and remove the baking parchment from the bottom of the layer. Invert the cake again onto a greased wire rack and cool completely before filling and frosting, at least 2 hours. 
To assemble, mix the strawberry preserves with the lemon zest in a bowl. Stack and fill the cakes, dividing the jam between the cake layers and topping each with thin coat of buttercream. Use the remaining buttercream to cover and decorate the sides and top to your liking.
For a tutorial on filling and frosting a cake, see here.
Makes 1 8-inch, three-layer cake.
Notes:
The ground hazelnuts can be substituted for an equal amount other ground nuts — almonds, walnuts or pistachio are winning bets. Or, if not your thing, omit nuts altogether and make up the difference with an equal amount (2 ounces, 1/2 cup) of sifted cake flour.
The cake layers can be made a day ahead and kept at room temperature overnight, wrapped well in clingfilm. As pictured, I used three 6-inch pans, baking the cakes for around 25 mintues.
I use a chunky, homemade strawberry preserve, one that’s not particularly sweet as far as jams go. If yours is on the sweeter side, you might want to pull back to 1/2 cup total. Also, keep in mind that a thick layer of jam will cause the cake to slide when stacked, so err on the side of miserly.
This cake plays well with other frostings. A malted or coffee buttercream would be ones I’d suggest, or even a good old whipped ganache.
I did a piece on decorating layer cakes for Saveur last year; if you’re looking for more tips, it might be of interest.

Hazelnut and strawberry celebration cake
Think of this cake as a gussied-up version of a Victoria sponge. The flavours are the same, as we’ve got the well-worn charm of strawberry jam, lemon and (butter)cream. Folding beaten egg whites into the batter, as done with chiffon cakes, results in an airy, delicate crumb. I’ve gone and mussed up that delicacy a little with ground hazelnuts, but I think the modest sacrifice in height is worth it — the cake has fluff but also has enough structure to stand up to the rich weight of the preserves, and it’s still plenty tall. I also happen to think that the teensy flecks of gold and brown look pretty, so there’s that, too.

The layers are adaptated from the Fluffy Yellow Layer Cake in The Cook’s Illustrated Cookbook (America’s Test Kitchen, 2011). The cake uses 6 yolks and 3 egg whites, so be sure to keep those extra 3 whites aside if making the Swiss Meringue Buttercream. 

For the cake
Softened butter and cake flour for pans
2 ounces hazelnuts, skin on, roasted and cooled
2 cups cake flour, sifted
1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 3/4 cup (12 1/4 ounces) granulated sugar, divided
10 tablespoons (5 ounces, 1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature
3 tablespoons neutral oil
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
6 egg yolks, at room temperature
3 egg whites, at room temperature 
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

To assemble
1/2-3/4 cup strawberry preserves
1/4-1/2 teaspoon lemon finely-grated lemon zest, or to taste
1/2 recipe Swiss Buttercream, with 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt added at the start (and without coconut)

Preheat an oven to 350°F (175°C). Grease three 8x2-inch pans with softened butter. Line the bases with parchment paper, grease the parchment, then dust bottoms and sides with flour, tapping out excess. Set aside.

In a food processor fitted with the metal blade, grind the hazelnuts into a fine meal. Stop the machine, scrape down the sides and pulse again one or two times. You should have about 1/2 cup hazelnut meal.

In a large bowl, whisk together the ground hazelnuts, cake flour, baking powder, baking soda, kosher salt and 1 1/2 cups of granulated sugar. In another bowl, or a jug with a pouring spout, whisk together the melted butter, buttermilk, neutral oil, vanilla extract and egg yolks. Set aside. 

In the bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites at medium speed until foamy. Sprinkle in the cream of tartar. Increase the mixer speed to medium-high, and with the machine running, pour in the remaining 1/4 cup granulated sugar in a steady stream. Continue to beat until the egg whites are glossy and stiff peaks form, about 2 to 3 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, scrape the egg whites into a bowl and set aside.

Add flour mixture to the now-empty mixer bowl. With the machine running on low speed, slowly pour in the buttermilk mixture, stirring until just incorporated, around 20 seconds. Stop the machine, scrape down the sides of the bowl and whisk again until there’s no visible flour, around 15 seconds more (note: due to the hazelnuts, this batter will not be completely smooth).

With a rubber spatula, stir 1/3 of the beaten egg whites into the batter to lighten. Add 1/2 of the remaining whites and fold gently until almost combined, a few white streaks can remain. Add the last of the whites and continue to fold until no streaks remain. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared cake pans. Tap the pans gently on the counter a few times to release any large air bubbles. 

Bake layers in a preheated oven until the cake begins to pull away from the edge of the pan and a cake tester (toothpick) inserted in the centre comes out clean, around 20 minutes. Cool cakes in pans on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Loosen the edge of the cakes with an offset spatula or butter knife, then invert onto a wire rack lined with clean parchment and remove the baking parchment from the bottom of the layer. Invert the cake again onto a greased wire rack and cool completely before filling and frosting, at least 2 hours. 

To assemble, mix the strawberry preserves with the lemon zest in a bowl. Stack and fill the cakes, dividing the jam between the cake layers and topping each with thin coat of buttercream. Use the remaining buttercream to cover and decorate the sides and top to your liking.

For a tutorial on filling and frosting a cake, see here.

Makes 1 8-inch, three-layer cake.

Notes:

  • The ground hazelnuts can be substituted for an equal amount other ground nuts — almonds, walnuts or pistachio are winning bets. Or, if not your thing, omit nuts altogether and make up the difference with an equal amount (2 ounces, 1/2 cup) of sifted cake flour.
  • The cake layers can be made a day ahead and kept at room temperature overnight, wrapped well in clingfilm. As pictured, I used three 6-inch pans, baking the cakes for around 25 mintues.
  • I use a chunky, homemade strawberry preserve, one that’s not particularly sweet as far as jams go. If yours is on the sweeter side, you might want to pull back to 1/2 cup total. Also, keep in mind that a thick layer of jam will cause the cake to slide when stacked, so err on the side of miserly.
  • This cake plays well with other frostings. A malted or coffee buttercream would be ones I’d suggest, or even a good old whipped ganache.
  • I did a piece on decorating layer cakes for Saveur last year; if you’re looking for more tips, it might be of interest.
Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

HS: I use lime here, I think it really adds something, a needed edge. That said, lemon is quite nice as well.


4 large / 500 g / 1 pound rhubarb stalks, chopped 2 cups / 400 g granulated sugar 2 cups / 240 ml water 2-3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice, or to taste scant 2 teaspoons rosewater, or to taste rose petals, optional


Combine the rhubarb and sugar in a medium, thick-bottomed saucepan. Stir well, and leave for 45 minutes or so (unheated), stirring now and then.

Add the water and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Continue to simmer for another 15-20 minutes, until the rhubarb starts to break down. Carefully strain into a bowl through a of cheesecloth-lined strainer. Transfer to a clean saucepan, stir in the lime juice, and bring to a simmer. Let simmer over medium heat for another 15 minutes or until the syrup has reduced quite a bit and thickened. Remove from heat and allow to cool completely.

Stir in the rosewater a bit at a time, until it is to your liking. Rose water can be quite an assertive flavor, so be judicious to start. It keeps, refrigerated, for a week or so.

Serve over yogurt, in soda water, or drizzled over waffles.

Makes one medium jar of syrup.
Prep time: 45 min  - Cook time: 30 min

Rhubarb Rosewater Syrup

HS: I use lime here, I think it really adds something, a needed edge. That said, lemon is quite nice as well.

4 large / 500 g / 1 pound rhubarb stalks, chopped
2 cups / 400 g granulated sugar
2 cups / 240 ml water
2-3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice, or to taste
scant 2 teaspoons rosewater, or to taste
rose petals, optional

Combine the rhubarb and sugar in a medium, thick-bottomed saucepan. Stir well, and leave for 45 minutes or so (unheated), stirring now and then.

Add the water and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Continue to simmer for another 15-20 minutes, until the rhubarb starts to break down. Carefully strain into a bowl through a of cheesecloth-lined strainer. Transfer to a clean saucepan, stir in the lime juice, and bring to a simmer. Let simmer over medium heat for another 15 minutes or until the syrup has reduced quite a bit and thickened. Remove from heat and allow to cool completely.

Stir in the rosewater a bit at a time, until it is to your liking. Rose water can be quite an assertive flavor, so be judicious to start. It keeps, refrigerated, for a week or so.

Serve over yogurt, in soda water, or drizzled over waffles.

Makes one medium jar of syrup.

Prep time: 45 min - Cook time: 30 min