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Tzatziki Potato Salad Mostly adapted from Ina Garten
Please forgive me, if you can, for running a recipe so close to one from a few years ago.* I cannot help it. When you find the tzatziki you want to spend the rest of your life with, you don’t go auditioning new ones on the side just in case. You just make it as often as you can and sometimes cold, boiled potatoes find their way in and those days, you get to call it lunch.
* Three whole days before having a baby. Why was I cooking? Really, you should have had a talk with me about that.
Here’s what I love about this salad, aside from the fact that it’s a cinch to make: it’s cool and refreshing while so many potato salads are full of heft — the the cucumber-dill-yogurt-lemon-garlic thing is like an edible air-conditioner. Such things come in handy during especially sticky NYC days.
4 pounds potatoes (I like tiny Yukon golds, but you can use whatever boiling potatoes you like for salads) 1 3/4 cups Greek yogurt (I used full-fat but I think other fat levels would work) 1/4 cup sour cream 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (from half a big lemon) 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon minced fresh dill 1 medium garlic clove, minced 2 teaspoons kosher salt (I use Diamond brand; use less if you use another, read why here) Freshly ground black pepper 1 hothouse or English cucumber (1 pound), unpeeled but quartered lengthwise, seeds removed
More ideas for additions: Crumbled feta, chopped green olives, chopped fresh mint leaves or a minced hot chile
In a medium pot, cover your potatoes with cold water and bring them to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, reduce heat to medium-high and let potatoes simmer until tender enough that they can be pierced easily with a skewer or slim knife. I find that small potatoes tend to be done in roughly 30 minutes from the time I put them on the stove cold, but it’s best to start checking 5 to 10 minutes sooner. Drain potatoes and let them cool completely. (This is a great step to do ahead, as it seems to take potatoes forever to cool. If you’re really in a rush, spread them on a tray and pop them in the freezer for 10 minutes.)
Meanwhile, in the bottom of a large bowl, stir together yogurt, sour cream, lemon juice, vinegar, dill, garlic, salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper.
Grate the cucumber on a box grater (or in your food processor’s shredding blade, if you like to get things done in one hundredth of the time) and try to remove some of the excess by squeezing out handfuls, pressing it in a mesh sieve with a spoon or wringing it in a square of cheesecloth or a lint-free dishtowel. Add to yogurt mixture.
Once potatoes are cool, cut tiny ones into quarters or larger ones into generous chunks. Add to cucumbers and yogurt and stir to coat. Add any extra ingredients desired. Adjust seasonings to taste. Either eat immediately or keep in the fridge for up to three days.

Tzatziki Potato Salad
Mostly adapted from Ina Garten

Please forgive me, if you can, for running a recipe so close to one from a few years ago.* I cannot help it. When you find the tzatziki you want to spend the rest of your life with, you don’t go auditioning new ones on the side just in case. You just make it as often as you can and sometimes cold, boiled potatoes find their way in and those days, you get to call it lunch.

* Three whole days before having a baby. Why was I cooking? Really, you should have had a talk with me about that.

Here’s what I love about this salad, aside from the fact that it’s a cinch to make: it’s cool and refreshing while so many potato salads are full of heft — the the cucumber-dill-yogurt-lemon-garlic thing is like an edible air-conditioner. Such things come in handy during especially sticky NYC days.

4 pounds potatoes (I like tiny Yukon golds, but you can use whatever boiling potatoes you like for salads)
1 3/4 cups Greek yogurt (I used full-fat but I think other fat levels would work)
1/4 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (from half a big lemon)
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon minced fresh dill
1 medium garlic clove, minced
2 teaspoons kosher salt (I use Diamond brand; use less if you use another, read why here)
Freshly ground black pepper
1 hothouse or English cucumber (1 pound), unpeeled but quartered lengthwise, seeds removed

More ideas for additions: Crumbled feta, chopped green olives, chopped fresh mint leaves or a minced hot chile

In a medium pot, cover your potatoes with cold water and bring them to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, reduce heat to medium-high and let potatoes simmer until tender enough that they can be pierced easily with a skewer or slim knife. I find that small potatoes tend to be done in roughly 30 minutes from the time I put them on the stove cold, but it’s best to start checking 5 to 10 minutes sooner. Drain potatoes and let them cool completely. (This is a great step to do ahead, as it seems to take potatoes forever to cool. If you’re really in a rush, spread them on a tray and pop them in the freezer for 10 minutes.)

Meanwhile, in the bottom of a large bowl, stir together yogurt, sour cream, lemon juice, vinegar, dill, garlic, salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper.

Grate the cucumber on a box grater (or in your food processor’s shredding blade, if you like to get things done in one hundredth of the time) and try to remove some of the excess by squeezing out handfuls, pressing it in a mesh sieve with a spoon or wringing it in a square of cheesecloth or a lint-free dishtowel. Add to yogurt mixture.

Once potatoes are cool, cut tiny ones into quarters or larger ones into generous chunks. Add to cucumbers and yogurt and stir to coat. Add any extra ingredients desired. Adjust seasonings to taste. Either eat immediately or keep in the fridge for up to three days.

Vidalia Onion Soup with Wild Rice and Blue Cheese Adapted, just a little, from Charlie Trotter via The New York Times
* Thankfully, Vidalias don’t require a trip to Georgia to buy (though, were it in my power, I’d be there in a heartbeat) as they’re fairly widely distributed; nevertheless, if you can’t get them at your grocery store (I found them at Whole Foods this time), I find that (Georgia-folk, please cover your ears) Spanish, Texas 1015s, Walla Walla and other sweet varieties of onion are adequate substitutes.
Due to the mild flavor of this soup, if you’ve got good, homemade stock stashed away, this is a great time to defrost it.
Trotter calls for an herb bundle in this soup that’s roughly 3/4 cup of your favorite fresh herbs, chopped. (He calls for 3 tablespoons chopped chives, basil, flat-leaf parsley and 4 tablespoons chopped tarragon, though I don’t think you need to be overly rigid in adhering to a formula.)
Serves 4
1/2 cup wild rice, uncooked 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 1/2 pounds (about 4) Vidalia onions, or other sweet onions, quartered and very thinly sliced 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock Herb bundle (see Note above) Salt and pepper 8 slices baguette 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 ounces Maytag or other young, not too sharp, blue cheese, at room temperature
Cook the wild rice in a small saucepan according to package directions. Usually, 2 cups of water is the amount needed for 1/2 cup wild rice. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a very low simmer and cover the pot. Let it cook, undisturbed, until the rice is tender and the water is absorbed, about 50 to 55 minutes. Set aside.
Melt the butter in the bottom of a 4- to 5-quart saucepan or Dutch oven over moderately low heat. Add the onions, toss to coat them in oil and cover the pot. Reduce the heat to real low and let them slowly steep for 15 minutes. They don’t need your attention; you can even check your email, eh, who are we kidding, Facebook.
After 15 minutes, uncover the pot, raise the heat slightly and season the onions with a bit of salt and pepper. Cook onions, stirring frequently, for another 15 to 25 minutes, until they are tender, limp and sweet. Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Wrap the herbs (see Note up top) in a small piece of cheesecloth and tie with kitchen string. Trotter suggests you drop the bundle into the broth for one minute, then remove it, but after going through such an effort to make one, I decided to leave mine in a little longer; it made me feel better. Adjust seasonings with additional salt and pepper, if needed.
Heat oven to 400 degrees. Brush both sides of the baguette slices with oil. Bake on a baking sheet until light golden brown, 5 to 10 minutes. While the croutons are still warm, spread them with blue cheese.
To serve, divide the rice among four bowls, and ladle broth and onions on top. Float two croutons in the center of each bowl, and sprinkle with more pepper. Eat immediately.

Vidalia Onion Soup with Wild Rice and Blue Cheese
Adapted, just a little, from Charlie Trotter via The New York Times

* Thankfully, Vidalias don’t require a trip to Georgia to buy (though, were it in my power, I’d be there in a heartbeat) as they’re fairly widely distributed; nevertheless, if you can’t get them at your grocery store (I found them at Whole Foods this time), I find that (Georgia-folk, please cover your ears) Spanish, Texas 1015s, Walla Walla and other sweet varieties of onion are adequate substitutes.

Due to the mild flavor of this soup, if you’ve got good, homemade stock stashed away, this is a great time to defrost it.

Trotter calls for an herb bundle in this soup that’s roughly 3/4 cup of your favorite fresh herbs, chopped. (He calls for 3 tablespoons chopped chives, basil, flat-leaf parsley and 4 tablespoons chopped tarragon, though I don’t think you need to be overly rigid in adhering to a formula.)

Serves 4

1/2 cup wild rice, uncooked
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 1/2 pounds (about 4) Vidalia onions, or other sweet onions, quartered and very thinly sliced
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
Herb bundle (see Note above)
Salt and pepper
8 slices baguette
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 ounces Maytag or other young, not too sharp, blue cheese, at room temperature

Cook the wild rice in a small saucepan according to package directions. Usually, 2 cups of water is the amount needed for 1/2 cup wild rice. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a very low simmer and cover the pot. Let it cook, undisturbed, until the rice is tender and the water is absorbed, about 50 to 55 minutes. Set aside.

Melt the butter in the bottom of a 4- to 5-quart saucepan or Dutch oven over moderately low heat. Add the onions, toss to coat them in oil and cover the pot. Reduce the heat to real low and let them slowly steep for 15 minutes. They don’t need your attention; you can even check your email, eh, who are we kidding, Facebook.

After 15 minutes, uncover the pot, raise the heat slightly and season the onions with a bit of salt and pepper. Cook onions, stirring frequently, for another 15 to 25 minutes, until they are tender, limp and sweet. Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes. Wrap the herbs (see Note up top) in a small piece of cheesecloth and tie with kitchen string. Trotter suggests you drop the bundle into the broth for one minute, then remove it, but after going through such an effort to make one, I decided to leave mine in a little longer; it made me feel better. Adjust seasonings with additional salt and pepper, if needed.

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Brush both sides of the baguette slices with oil. Bake on a baking sheet until light golden brown, 5 to 10 minutes. While the croutons are still warm, spread them with blue cheese.

To serve, divide the rice among four bowls, and ladle broth and onions on top. Float two croutons in the center of each bowl, and sprinkle with more pepper. Eat immediately.

oldhollywood:

Akira Kurosawa conferring with Francis Ford Coppola for a commercial they filmed for Suntory Whiskey during the shoot of Kagemusha. The commercial can be seen here. 
(via)

oldhollywood:

Akira Kurosawa conferring with Francis Ford Coppola for a commercial they filmed for Suntory Whiskey during the shoot of Kagemusha. The commercial can be seen here

(via)

Ingredients
2 c. almond milk
1/3 c. granulated sugar
1 vanilla bean
1 tsp. vanilla (optional—add for more intense vanilla flavor)
Instructions
Combine almond milk and sugar in a large saucepan. Slice open vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape insides into saucepan, then place empty vanilla bean into mixture. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, whisking to break up clumps of vanilla. Once mixture has come to a simmer, reduce heat to low and cook 10 minutes more, whisking occasionally.
Allow vanilla mixture to come to room temperature. Pour through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl with a spout, then pour mixture into ice cube trays. Freeze until completely solid, 3-4 hours (depending on the temperature of your freezer and size of the cubes). Serve with iced coffee, tea, or other beverages.
Notes

You can use any kind of milk you like in these and I’m sure it will be fabulous. But I’ve only tested this recipe with almond milk.

Ingredients

  • 2 c. almond milk
  • 1/3 c. granulated sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 1 tsp. vanilla (optional—add for more intense vanilla flavor)

Instructions

  1. Combine almond milk and sugar in a large saucepan. Slice open vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape insides into saucepan, then place empty vanilla bean into mixture. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, whisking to break up clumps of vanilla. Once mixture has come to a simmer, reduce heat to low and cook 10 minutes more, whisking occasionally.
  2. Allow vanilla mixture to come to room temperature. Pour through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl with a spout, then pour mixture into ice cube trays. Freeze until completely solid, 3-4 hours (depending on the temperature of your freezer and size of the cubes). Serve with iced coffee, tea, or other beverages.

Notes

You can use any kind of milk you like in these and I’m sure it will be fabulous. But I’ve only tested this recipe with almond milk.

oldhollywood:

Joan Fontaine and Judith Anderson in publicity still for Rebecca (1940, dir. Alfred Hitchcock) (via)
“Her voice dropped to a whisper. ‘Sometimes, when I walk along the corridor here, I fancy I hear her just behind me. That quick, light footstep. I could not mistake it anywhere. It’s almost as though I catch the sound of her dress sweeping the stairs as she comes down to dinner.’
 She paused. She went on looking at me, watching my eyes. ‘Do you think she can see us, talking to one another now?’ she said slowly. ‘Do you think the dead come back and watch the living?’” 
-Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (1938)

oldhollywood:

Joan Fontaine and Judith Anderson in publicity still for Rebecca (1940, dir. Alfred Hitchcock) (via)

“Her voice dropped to a whisper. ‘Sometimes, when I walk along the corridor here, I fancy I hear her just behind me. That quick, light footstep. I could not mistake it anywhere. It’s almost as though I catch the sound of her dress sweeping the stairs as she comes down to dinner.’

She paused. She went on looking at me, watching my eyes. ‘Do you think she can see us, talking to one another now?’ she said slowly. ‘Do you think the dead come back and watch the living?’” 

-Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (1938)

Nut-Caramel Bars with Dried FigsFrom Home Made by Yvette Van Boven1 1/3 cups blanched almonds1 1/3 cups walnuts or pecans1 1/3 cups sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts or a mixture of them all7 oz dried figs (I used dried cherries)juice & zest of 1/2 orangesunflower oil for greasing purposes1 1/3 cups superfine sugar3 tablespoons maple syrup1/2 stick butterpinch of saltPreheat the oven to 340F/Gas 4. Arrange the nuts over a sheet of parchment paper on a cookie sheet and bake for approx. 15 minutes until golden brown and crisp, turning halfway through. Transfer the nuts to a bowl and stir in the figs and orange zest. Line a shallow rectangular baking sheet with wax paper. Brush the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Heat the sugar, syrup and orange juice in a heavy bottomed saucepan until the sugar has dissolved. Stir gently with a wooden spoon, but beware of splatters, since it will get very hot. Lastly, stir in the butter and salt. The sauce will become thicker. Fold in the nuts and stir well. Pour the mixture onto the greased paper and spread evenly. After approx. 15 minutes, score into bars with the back of a knife when it is nearly cool.Leave to fully cool.Break the slab along the score lines. You can keep the bars for some time in a sealed box separated by sheets of wax paper.ps, While I was sent a review copy of this book - I wasn’t asked or payed to write about it. All opinions are my own -  this is a fantastic book, I wouldn’t lie to you guys!

Nut-Caramel Bars with Dried Figs
From Home Made by Yvette Van Boven

1 1/3 cups blanched almonds
1 1/3 cups walnuts or pecans
1 1/3 cups sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts or a mixture of them all
7 oz dried figs (I used dried cherries)
juice & zest of 1/2 orange
sunflower oil for greasing purposes
1 1/3 cups superfine sugar
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1/2 stick butter
pinch of salt

Preheat the oven to 340F/Gas 4. Arrange the nuts over a sheet of parchment paper on a cookie sheet and bake for approx. 15 minutes until golden brown and crisp, turning halfway through. Transfer the nuts to a bowl and stir in the figs and orange zest. Line a shallow rectangular baking sheet with wax paper. Brush the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Heat the sugar, syrup and orange juice in a heavy bottomed saucepan until the sugar has dissolved. Stir gently with a wooden spoon, but beware of splatters, since it will get very hot. Lastly, stir in the butter and salt. The sauce will become thicker. Fold in the nuts and stir well. Pour the mixture onto the greased paper and spread evenly. After approx. 15 minutes, score into bars with the back of a knife when it is nearly cool.
Leave to fully cool.
Break the slab along the score lines.
You can keep the bars for some time in a sealed box separated by sheets of wax paper.


ps, While I was sent a review copy of this book - I wasn’t asked or payed to write about it. All opinions are my own -  this is a fantastic book, I wouldn’t lie to you guys!

artruby:

Matthew Ritchie installation performance at Venice Beach.

(Source: artruby)

artchipel:

Roby Dwi Antono (b.1990, Indonesia) - Young blood / Tak terdengar olehku / Jum’at pagi (2011)

[more Roby Dwi Antono | artist found at meesoohl]

(Source: artchipel)

oldhollywood:

Jean Harlow on the set of Red Dust (1932, dir. Victor Fleming) (via)

oldhollywood:

Jean Harlow on the set of Red Dust (1932, dir. Victor Fleming) (via)

honey & jam tartscrust recipe adapted from Bon Appétitmake 3 small tarts 1 3/4 cups all purpose flour 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1/4 cup honey 2 large egg yolksjam of your choicefruit of your choiceFor crust:
Mix flour, sugar,and salt in processor. Add butter; using on/off turns, process until mixture resembles coarse meal. Whisk honey,and yolks in bowl. Add honey mixture to flour mixture; using on/off turns, process until clumps form. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic; chill 1 hour.Roll dough out on floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer to 10-inch tart pan (or three individual sized tart pans) with removable bottom. Press dough onto bottom and up sides of pan. Fold overhang in; press to form double layer. Cover and chill 30 minutes or up to 1 day.Preheat the oven to 350. Remove tart pans from fridge, spread a layer of jam into the bottom. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Allow to cool, top with fresh fruit.

honey & jam tarts
crust recipe adapted from Bon Appétit
make 3 small tarts


1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1/4 cup honey
2 large egg yolks
jam of your choice
fruit of your choice

For crust:
Mix flour, sugar,and salt in processor. Add butter; using on/off turns, process until mixture resembles coarse meal. Whisk honey,and yolks in bowl. Add honey mixture to flour mixture; using on/off turns, process until clumps form. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic; chill 1 hour.

Roll dough out on floured surface to 12-inch round. Transfer to 10-inch tart pan (or three individual sized tart pans) with removable bottom. Press dough onto bottom and up sides of pan. Fold overhang in; press to form double layer. Cover and chill 30 minutes or up to 1 day.

Preheat the oven to 350. Remove tart pans from fridge, spread a layer of jam into the bottom. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Allow to cool, top with fresh fruit.

cavetocanvas:

Blood on paper works by Roberto Ferri

artchipel:

Idris Khan (b.1978, UK) - Pretty as a Thousand Postcards (2012)

The Houses of Parliament & The London Eye, London

[more Idris Khan | artist found at alecshao]

(Source: artchipel)

rerylikes:

Gustav Klimt (July 14 1862 – February 6 1918, Austria-Hungary) 

The Kiss. Oil on canvas, 180×180 cm (1906-1908)
Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Oil on canvas, 138×138 cm (1907)

wowgreat:

2012-07-12 22.19.33 (by HolgerLippmann (work in process))

wowgreat:

2012-07-12 22.19.33 (by HolgerLippmann (work in process))

gastrogirl:

cherry sour cocktail.


Cherry Sours
2 cups cherries, pitted
2 lemons, juiced 3 limes, juiced 1/2 cup grapefruit juice 1/4 cup maraschino cherry juice 1/2 cup bourbon 1/4 cup brandy 1/2 cup simple syrup
In a large bowl, add the pitted cherries, lemon juice, lime juice, and simple syrup. Mash with a potato masher to break up the cherries. Add the maraschino cherry juice, bourbon, and brandy. Stir to combine. Pour into a pitcher and pour over ice. Garnish with a cherry.

gastrogirl:

cherry sour cocktail.


Cherry Sours

2 cups cherries, pitted

2 lemons, juiced
3 limes, juiced
1/2 cup grapefruit juice
1/4 cup maraschino cherry juice
1/2 cup bourbon
1/4 cup brandy
1/2 cup simple syrup

In a large bowl, add the pitted cherries, lemon juice, lime juice, and simple syrup. Mash with a potato masher to break up the cherries. Add the maraschino cherry juice, bourbon, and brandy. Stir to combine. Pour into a pitcher and pour over ice. Garnish with a cherry.

(via veganfeast)