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Random Stuff about Random Things...Totally Random.

Offer: Tickets for a Great Crime Tour of London

Offer: Organic Afternoon Tea or Afternoon Tea with Prosecco for Two People

Offer: One and a Half Hour Whisky Tasting Session

retrogasm:

Probably tastes like vanilla…

retrogasm:

Probably tastes like vanilla…

tart-pastry:

An unscientific way to tell if milk has gone bad is to sniff it and see if it smells sour.
But, General Electric and Quirky, a crowdsourcing site for product development, have jointly developed a gadget that will allow us to give up our reliance on our nose for that purpose.
In the very near-future, possibly, we will wait for our “smart” milk jug to detect, for us, when the milk is losing its freshness. An L.E.D. mounted on the vessel, prompted by a clutch of sensors at its base, will slowly change color from green to orange. A text message will inform the owner of the spoiled status as well as the volume of liquid left.

tart-pastry:

An unscientific way to tell if milk has gone bad is to sniff it and see if it smells sour.

But, General Electric and Quirky, a crowdsourcing site for product development, have jointly developed a gadget that will allow us to give up our reliance on our nose for that purpose.

In the very near-future, possibly, we will wait for our “smart” milk jug to detect, for us, when the milk is losing its freshness. An L.E.D. mounted on the vessel, prompted by a clutch of sensors at its base, will slowly change color from green to orange. A text message will inform the owner of the spoiled status as well as the volume of liquid left.

thedsgnblog:

Dapper Paper   |   http://dapperpaper.blogspot.com

We’re Chris and Elizabeth Boyette, a husband and wife team of designers behind Dapper Paper. We love design, food, music and pajamas. We’re always seeing things, making things or cooking things that we want to share with others. So we started this blog to do just that. This is spiffy stuff we heart.

the design blog:  facebook | twitter | pinterest

(via thedsgnblog)

takahikohayashi:

カムイユカラ(12)-オキキリムイ kamuy yukar(12)-okikirmuy image20x15cm 林孝彦 HAYASHI Takahiko 2009

takahikohayashi:

カムイユカラ(12)-オキキリムイ kamuy yukar(12)-okikirmuy
 image20x15cm
 林孝彦 HAYASHI Takahiko 2009

digestart:

Reader’s Digest Condensed Books, 1965

Illustrations: Mitchell Hooks

Hook’s illustrations tend to be use a lot of sketch-like quality and candy-bright, unnatural colour schemes. His artwork is so fun to look at!

Find out more about Hooks and his illustrations at Today’s Inspiration.

alecshao:

Emma McNally

1. C40, 2011 - white graphite

2. Double Orbit, 2011 - graphite, black carbon, steel nails

3. Cartographic Polyrhythms, 2011 - digital hybrid

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

land-of-the-morning-calm:

Flask with Waterfowl and Plant Decoration

The robust glazed stoneware of the Joseon dynasty called buncheong is an outgrowth of earlier Goryeo celadon pottery. The inlaid black-and-white slip paste designs (a technique called sanggam, in Korean) and overlying celadon glaze of the flask are based on Goryeo pottery practice. In technique, subject, and style, this small flask is an especially instructive object of cultural transition from the refined Goryeo aesthetics of the Buddhist court and aristocracy to the prevailing Neo-Confucian ethics of the early Joseon dynasty that demanded wares of a simpler nature.  

Korean, Joseon Dynasty(1392–1910) Flask with Waterfowl and Plant Decoration, First half of 15th century, Glazed stoneware (buncheong) with black and white clay inlaid decoration (sanggam). Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Gift of Brooks McCormick Jr. 2003.7.

(Source: smartmuseum)

actegratuit:

Beautiful transparent portraits from medical illustrator and animator Bryan Christie

(Source: bryanchristieblog.blogspot.it)

SculptureCenter: Ethan Greenbaum’s recent photographic work simulates concrete, tiles,...

sculpture-center:

Ethan Greenbaum’s recent photographic work simulates concrete, tiles, bricks, and other surface-covering materials. He uses digital photography, flatbed printing, and vacuum forming to create low relief panels that upend our relationship to everyday surfaces. The urban environment is brought…

nevver:

le Bat

artsfortransit:

In celebration of the recently rehabilitated D Line in Brooklyn, we’d like to share a selection of images from some of the amazing new installations for you to check out!

Up first, artist Xin Song Located in the mezzanine window at the Bay Parkway Station, Tree of Life bridges the art of contemporary photo collage and traditional Chinese paper cut to evoke the community that surrounds the station, in a masterwork of precision and grace.

Xin Song began by photographing the busy street scene below the elevated station.  Using traditional paper cutting techniques, she transformed the colorful imagery from her photos into an intricate pattern, creating a symmetrical and vibrant flowering tree.   This unique work is laminated between thick panes of glass, and can be viewed from two sides.  From the outside of the window, a black silhouette appears, creating a graphic filigree reminiscent of Brooklyn’s historic iron work.  The interior view, which serves as the focal point upon entering the station mezzanine, is a colorful collage of the contemporary life in the neighborhood.

For Song, the subway itself, the surrounding neighborhoods and peoples’ daily movements, are the threads that connect the diverse community. The complex interplay of Song’s cut paper designs with the color, forms and figures meticulously cut out from the photographs offer riders a visual record to continuously rediscover their surroundings. The pattern and technique used to create Tree of Life will speak to all, including the many Asian-American families who have transformed the community in recent years.

Above: Xin Song, Tree of Life, laminated glass. 2012